Dakawa Development Center: An African National Congress Settlement in Tanzania, 1982-1992

The records of the ANC in exile are being deposited in the Liberation Archives at the University of Fort Hare Library, South Africa. This article uses these records, and oral sources, to depict life at the Dakawa Development Centre, an ANC settlement in Tanzania from 1982 to 1992. It describes the origins of Dakawa, as well as its functions. These included the preparation of students for the Solomon Mahlangu Freedom College (Somafco) at Mazimbu; the ‘rehabilitation’ of those who, for various reasons, had diverged from norms acceptable to the ANC authorities; the production of agricultural and light industrial goods; the training of skilled workers; and the creation of a cultural centre. These and other aspects are examined against the background of sometimes conflicting politics at the Centre, and in relation to the stresses of exile in an often difficult and unhealthy environment. Finally, the impact of the political changes of the early 1990s in South Africa on this community is described. Notes, ref., sum.

Title: Dakawa Development Center: An African National Congress Settlement in Tanzania, 1982-1992
Author: Morrow, Sen
Year: 1998
Periodical: African Affairs: The Journal of the Royal African Society
Volume: 97
Issue: 389
Period: October
Pages: 497-521
Language: English
Geographic terms: Tanzania
South Africa
External link: https://www.jstor.org/stable/723343
Abstract: The records of the ANC in exile are being deposited in the Liberation Archives at the University of Fort Hare Library, South Africa. This article uses these records, and oral sources, to depict life at the Dakawa Development Centre, an ANC settlement in Tanzania from 1982 to 1992. It describes the origins of Dakawa, as well as its functions. These included the preparation of students for the Solomon Mahlangu Freedom College (Somafco) at Mazimbu; the ‘rehabilitation’ of those who, for various reasons, had diverged from norms acceptable to the ANC authorities; the production of agricultural and light industrial goods; the training of skilled workers; and the creation of a cultural centre. These and other aspects are examined against the background of sometimes conflicting politics at the Centre, and in relation to the stresses of exile in an often difficult and unhealthy environment. Finally, the impact of the political changes of the early 1990s in South Africa on this community is described. Notes, ref., sum.