Architectural History of Cape Coast

The traditional vernacular name of Cape Coast (Ghana) is Oguaa, from the Fante Gua, meaning ‘market’. Trade between the inhabitants of this settlement and the Europeans flourished in the 16th century, but there is no evidence of any European building activity there until the middle of the 17th century, after the Dutch conquest of Elmina. The author relates the physical structure of the town to its historical development and then discusses the architecture of Cape Coast, and describes a few of the town’s major historical buildings: Government House, Gothic House, Swanzy Mills, Braeside House, Mrs Swanzy’s own house, Acquah’s Hotel, Fortgate House, and St. Mary’s Convent. Notes, ref.

Title: Architectural History of Cape Coast
Author: Hyland, A.D.C.
Year: 1995
Periodical: Transactions of the Historical Society of Ghana
Issue: 1
Pages: 163-184
Language: English
Geographic term: Ghana
External link: https://www.jstor.org/stable/41406616
Abstract: The traditional vernacular name of Cape Coast (Ghana) is Oguaa, from the Fante Gua, meaning ‘market’. Trade between the inhabitants of this settlement and the Europeans flourished in the 16th century, but there is no evidence of any European building activity there until the middle of the 17th century, after the Dutch conquest of Elmina. The author relates the physical structure of the town to its historical development and then discusses the architecture of Cape Coast, and describes a few of the town’s major historical buildings: Government House, Gothic House, Swanzy Mills, Braeside House, Mrs Swanzy’s own house, Acquah’s Hotel, Fortgate House, and St. Mary’s Convent. Notes, ref.