Religious change among women in urban Botswana

This paper on religious change among women in urban Botswana is based on data from Gaborone, where a total of 1,413 women from three different areas, selected to reflect differing income groups, were interviewed. Some of the results indicate that there are significant differences in religious perceptions between these groups. The results also show that the mainline churches have lost substantial numbers to the African Independent Churches, whereas considerably fewer cross in the opposite direction. The total number of adherents of the African churches is by now much greater than that of the mainline churches. More importantly, the mainline churches are often perceived as not satisfying the spiritual needs of their members. The larger and older established African churches seem to be retaining their members quite successfully. New African churches continue to proliferate, and there is considerable movement of members between these churches. There is clearly a large amount of religious uncertainty, of which the high rate of religious change is a symptom, and there is also a perceptible drift away from organized religion altogether. Bibliogr., notes, ref.

Title: Religious change among women in urban Botswana
Author: Parratt, Saroj N.
Year: 1995
Periodical: Journal of Religion in Africa
Volume: 25
Issue: 1
Pages: 73-84
Language: English
Geographic term: Botswana
External link: https://www.jstor.org/stable/pdf/1581139.pdf
Abstract: This paper on religious change among women in urban Botswana is based on data from Gaborone, where a total of 1,413 women from three different areas, selected to reflect differing income groups, were interviewed. Some of the results indicate that there are significant differences in religious perceptions between these groups. The results also show that the mainline churches have lost substantial numbers to the African Independent Churches, whereas considerably fewer cross in the opposite direction. The total number of adherents of the African churches is by now much greater than that of the mainline churches. More importantly, the mainline churches are often perceived as not satisfying the spiritual needs of their members. The larger and older established African churches seem to be retaining their members quite successfully. New African churches continue to proliferate, and there is considerable movement of members between these churches. There is clearly a large amount of religious uncertainty, of which the high rate of religious change is a symptom, and there is also a perceptible drift away from organized religion altogether. Bibliogr., notes, ref.