Africa: A Diplomatic Battleground in the Arab-Israeli Conflict,1967-1973

This paper examines the attitude of the black African States to the Arab-Israeli conflict and the relations between Africa and Israel during the period 1967-1973. The newly independent black African nations played important roles in the UN as well as within the OAU in the efforts to reach a negotiated peace settlement between the Arabs and Israel. The black African nations exercised much self-interest in arranging and implementing their cooperative ventures. Their movement away from the super and colonial powers in their search for development assistance elsewhere, allowed them to accept assistance from both the Arabs and the Israelis. This shows that their foreign policy was an extension of their domestic policies. In looking at the international arena overall, and in examining the goals and strategies of individual nations and groups of nations, it is clear that the self-interest, as well as the interconnectedness of nations left little room for them to manoeuvre individually. This case study also shows how the interests of nations and their actions change over time. Soon after independence, African countries viewed Israel as a friendly nation with which they could cooperate. But in the end, when the philosophical and ideological priorities of African countries were threatened, they meted out punishment or abandoned Israel altogether. App., notes, ref.

Title: Africa: A Diplomatic Battleground in the Arab-Israeli Conflict,1967-1973
Author: Johnson, Maudelyn
Year: 1992
Periodical: Ufahamu
Volume: 20
Issue: 3
Pages: 32-50
Language: English
Geographic terms: Subsaharan Africa
Israel
Egypt
Abstract: This paper examines the attitude of the black African States to the Arab-Israeli conflict and the relations between Africa and Israel during the period 1967-1973. The newly independent black African nations played important roles in the UN as well as within the OAU in the efforts to reach a negotiated peace settlement between the Arabs and Israel. The black African nations exercised much self-interest in arranging and implementing their cooperative ventures. Their movement away from the super and colonial powers in their search for development assistance elsewhere, allowed them to accept assistance from both the Arabs and the Israelis. This shows that their foreign policy was an extension of their domestic policies. In looking at the international arena overall, and in examining the goals and strategies of individual nations and groups of nations, it is clear that the self-interest, as well as the interconnectedness of nations left little room for them to manoeuvre individually. This case study also shows how the interests of nations and their actions change over time. Soon after independence, African countries viewed Israel as a friendly nation with which they could cooperate. But in the end, when the philosophical and ideological priorities of African countries were threatened, they meted out punishment or abandoned Israel altogether. App., notes, ref.