Berbers and Blacks: Ibadi Slave Traffic in Eighth-Century North Africa

The aim of this article is to illustrate the process whereby certain Berber tribes during the eighth century AD substituted slaves from the regions south of the Sahara, the Bilad al-Sudan, for Berber slaves from North Africa. From the outset, this conversion was influenced strongly, if not instigated, by Iba.di merchants, until the slave trade became a predominantly Iba.di monopoly from the mid-eighth century onwards. The slave trade along the central Sudan route in particular provided the increase in the community’s wealth and security, as well as the means for its establishment and expansion as a Muslim sect among diverse Berber tribes and, finally, the origins for the subsequent, far-flung network of trans-Saharan trade. Notes, ref., sum.

Title: Berbers and Blacks: Ibadi Slave Traffic in Eighth-Century North Africa
Author: Savage, Elizabeth
Year: 1992
Periodical: The Journal of African History
Volume: 33
Issue: 3
Pages: 351-368
Language: English
Geographic terms: Northern Africa
Sahara
External link: https://www.jstor.org/stable/183137
Abstract: The aim of this article is to illustrate the process whereby certain Berber tribes during the eighth century AD substituted slaves from the regions south of the Sahara, the Bilad al-Sudan, for Berber slaves from North Africa. From the outset, this conversion was influenced strongly, if not instigated, by Iba.di merchants, until the slave trade became a predominantly Iba.di monopoly from the mid-eighth century onwards. The slave trade along the central Sudan route in particular provided the increase in the community’s wealth and security, as well as the means for its establishment and expansion as a Muslim sect among diverse Berber tribes and, finally, the origins for the subsequent, far-flung network of trans-Saharan trade. Notes, ref., sum.