The security forces in a new South Africa

The reform process launched in South Africa by President F.W. De Klerk will involve major adjustments for the South African Defence Force (SADF), the South African Police (SAP), the homeland armies, and guerrilla forces. Given the SADF’s recent history of regional destabilization, attacks against ANC targets and combating internal unrest, the idea of integration presents enormous political obstacles as well as related social and economic problems. ‘Integration’ refers not only to the possible accommodation of Umkhonto we Sizwe/MK (the military wing of the ANC), AZAPLA (Azanian People’s Liberation Army, the armed section of the PAC) and AZANLA (Azanian National Liberation Army, the military wing of the Azanian People’s Organisation) cadres within the SADF, but also to complete nonracialism in the force. The experience of Namibia is highlighted as a recent illustration of the process of integration. Obstacles to integration and future defence structure options are discussed. Notes, ref.

Title: The security forces in a new South Africa
Author: Mills, G.
Year: 1991
Periodical: The World Today: Chatham House Review
Volume: 47
Issue: 3
Pages: 43-47
Language: English
Geographic term: South Africa
Abstract: The reform process launched in South Africa by President F.W. De Klerk will involve major adjustments for the South African Defence Force (SADF), the South African Police (SAP), the homeland armies, and guerrilla forces. Given the SADF’s recent history of regional destabilization, attacks against ANC targets and combating internal unrest, the idea of integration presents enormous political obstacles as well as related social and economic problems. ‘Integration’ refers not only to the possible accommodation of Umkhonto we Sizwe/MK (the military wing of the ANC), AZAPLA (Azanian People’s Liberation Army, the armed section of the PAC) and AZANLA (Azanian National Liberation Army, the military wing of the Azanian People’s Organisation) cadres within the SADF, but also to complete nonracialism in the force. The experience of Namibia is highlighted as a recent illustration of the process of integration. Obstacles to integration and future defence structure options are discussed. Notes, ref.