Population Growth and Reproduction in Sub-Saharan Africa: Technical Analysis of Fertility and its Consequences

In 1983, the World Bank commissioned several scholars to prepare background papers for a report on population strategies for sub-Saharan Africa. These papers formed the basis for a World Bank Policy Study, ‘Population growth and policies in sub-Saharan Africa’ (1986). A selection of these papers is collected in the present volume. They have been revised, updated, and in most cases severely condensed to expose the core of their arguments. The volume begins with information on demographic conditions in the region. In part 2, the economic consequences of population growth are viewed from the perspectives of agriculture, household energy, resources, and employment. The urban component of population growth and strategies for dealing with it are also discussed. Part 3 contains analyses of the impact of reproductive patterns upon the health of women and young children and of the region’s high fertility upon the family and its resources. Part 4 deals with the main component of rapid population growth, very high fertility, which is still rising in some areas. Part 5 traces the changes during the past decade in the way sub-Saharan government leaders and scholars view population policy and development, and specifically the control of population growth and organized family planning.

Title: Population Growth and Reproduction in Sub-Saharan Africa: Technical Analysis of Fertility and its Consequences
Editors: Acsadi, George T.F.
Johnson-Acsadi, Gwendolyn
Bulatao, Rodolfo A.
Year: 1990
Pages: 251
Language: English
City of publisher: Washington, D.C.
Publisher: The World Bank
ISBN: 0821313975
Geographic term: Subsaharan Africa
Abstract: In 1983, the World Bank commissioned several scholars to prepare background papers for a report on population strategies for sub-Saharan Africa. These papers formed the basis for a World Bank Policy Study, ‘Population growth and policies in sub-Saharan Africa’ (1986). A selection of these papers is collected in the present volume. They have been revised, updated, and in most cases severely condensed to expose the core of their arguments. The volume begins with information on demographic conditions in the region. In part 2, the economic consequences of population growth are viewed from the perspectives of agriculture, household energy, resources, and employment. The urban component of population growth and strategies for dealing with it are also discussed. Part 3 contains analyses of the impact of reproductive patterns upon the health of women and young children and of the region’s high fertility upon the family and its resources. Part 4 deals with the main component of rapid population growth, very high fertility, which is still rising in some areas. Part 5 traces the changes during the past decade in the way sub-Saharan government leaders and scholars view population policy and development, and specifically the control of population growth and organized family planning.