Generating marketed surplus of food through state farms: a critical evaluation of the Ethiopian experience

The central purpose of this research paper is to examine whether State farms provide the best strategy for increasing marketed surplus of food grains in Ethiopia. The paper is organized as follows: chapter one is an introduction. In the next chapter a brief theoretical framework for studying the role of a transitional agricultural sector in the process of (primitive) socialist accumulation, marketed surplus and State farming is presented. The third chapter discusses the scenario for the establishment and later the proliferation of State farms in Ethiopia. Chapters four and five then investigate the main hypothesis. The economics of State farms with an empirical analysis of production and cost of production as well as financial analysis is accommodated in chapter four. In chapter five the potentials and limitations of State farms and non-State farms in raising marketed surplus of food is looked at. The author concludes, in the last chapter, by summarizing the major findings and reviewing the differences/similarities with respect to State farming between Ethiopia and some socialist oriented countries, and the relevance of this for Ethiopia’s policy.

Title: Generating marketed surplus of food through state farms: a critical evaluation of the Ethiopian experience
Author: Gabriel, Abebe Haile
Year: 1990
ISSN: 0921-0210
Issue: 72
Pages: 90
Language: English
Series: Working papers, General series
City of publisher: The Hague
Publisher: Institute of Social Studies
Geographic term: Ethiopia
External link: https://hdl.handle.net/1765/18915
Abstract: The central purpose of this research paper is to examine whether State farms provide the best strategy for increasing marketed surplus of food grains in Ethiopia. The paper is organized as follows: chapter one is an introduction. In the next chapter a brief theoretical framework for studying the role of a transitional agricultural sector in the process of (primitive) socialist accumulation, marketed surplus and State farming is presented. The third chapter discusses the scenario for the establishment and later the proliferation of State farms in Ethiopia. Chapters four and five then investigate the main hypothesis. The economics of State farms with an empirical analysis of production and cost of production as well as financial analysis is accommodated in chapter four. In chapter five the potentials and limitations of State farms and non-State farms in raising marketed surplus of food is looked at. The author concludes, in the last chapter, by summarizing the major findings and reviewing the differences/similarities with respect to State farming between Ethiopia and some socialist oriented countries, and the relevance of this for Ethiopia’s policy.