Group areas

The Group Areas Act of 1950, which took its final form in 1966, was a major plank in the structure of the apartheid policy of the National Party. The Act applies to that part of South Africa’s land surface not set aside under the Land Acts for African use and occupation. The thrust of the Group Areas Act is the division of the population of South Africa into racial groups, and the division of parts of the land surface into group areas. In recent years the Act has been increasingly ignored by South Africans of all colours. Many called for its abolition and campaigned against it. In 1989 the government brought into operation the Free Settlement Areas Act, which permits the proclamation of areas where all restrictions on ownership and occupation contained in the Group Areas Act will not apply. However, this Act still rests on the principle of group areas. Notes, ref.

Title: Group areas
Author: Rutsch, P.
Year: 1990
Periodical: South African Human Rights and Labour Law Yearbook
Volume: 1
Pages: 139-151
Language: English
Geographic term: South Africa
Abstract: The Group Areas Act of 1950, which took its final form in 1966, was a major plank in the structure of the apartheid policy of the National Party. The Act applies to that part of South Africa’s land surface not set aside under the Land Acts for African use and occupation. The thrust of the Group Areas Act is the division of the population of South Africa into racial groups, and the division of parts of the land surface into group areas. In recent years the Act has been increasingly ignored by South Africans of all colours. Many called for its abolition and campaigned against it. In 1989 the government brought into operation the Free Settlement Areas Act, which permits the proclamation of areas where all restrictions on ownership and occupation contained in the Group Areas Act will not apply. However, this Act still rests on the principle of group areas. Notes, ref.