Is Artificial Rainmaking a Viable Option for Improved Water Supply for Nigerian Cities? A Case Study of Kano, Nigeria

The provision of adequate and portable water for urban residents has become a major problem in Nigeria. One of the reasons for this is the difficulty of obtaining new sources of water supply. In view of this problem and the importance of water, the federal government has been exploring many ways of supplementing the nation’s inadequate rainfall. One of the alternatives under consideration relates to the possibility of cloud seeding to induce artificial rain especially in the drier northern region of the country. This paper examines whether this is a viable alternative. Using a case study of Kano, an attempt is made to establish whether there is enough humidity at the freezing level of initial precipitation. The results show that there is only a slight direct relationship between relative humidity at the freezing level and rainfall at the surface. Thus, artificial rainmaking may not be a viable method of supplementing natural rainfall in this region. Ref.

Title: Is Artificial Rainmaking a Viable Option for Improved Water Supply for Nigerian Cities? A Case Study of Kano, Nigeria
Author: Salau, Oreoluwa
Year: 1989
Periodical: African Urban Studies
Volume: 4
Issue: 1-2
Period: February-May
Pages: 117-121
Language: English
Geographic term: Nigeria
Abstract: The provision of adequate and portable water for urban residents has become a major problem in Nigeria. One of the reasons for this is the difficulty of obtaining new sources of water supply. In view of this problem and the importance of water, the federal government has been exploring many ways of supplementing the nation’s inadequate rainfall. One of the alternatives under consideration relates to the possibility of cloud seeding to induce artificial rain especially in the drier northern region of the country. This paper examines whether this is a viable alternative. Using a case study of Kano, an attempt is made to establish whether there is enough humidity at the freezing level of initial precipitation. The results show that there is only a slight direct relationship between relative humidity at the freezing level and rainfall at the surface. Thus, artificial rainmaking may not be a viable method of supplementing natural rainfall in this region. Ref.