The Khartoum Declaration, 1988

Publication, in two successive issues of ‘Rural Progress’, of the Khartoum Declaration, adopted at the International Conference on the ‘Human dimension of Africa’s economic recovery and development’, held under UN auspices in Khartoum, Sudan, from 5-8 March, 1988, as a sequel to the International Conference on ‘Africa: the challenge of economic recovery and accelerated development’, held in Abuja, Nigeria, in June 1987. The analytical part of the Khartoum Declaration (reproduced in a condensed and slightly edited version) contains an overall assessment of the human condition in Africa and criticizes many structural adjustment programmes for being incomplete, mechanistic and of too short a time perspective. It concludes that the human dimension is the sine qua non of economic recovery. The conclusions and recommendations cover the following topics: incorporating the human factor in the recovery and structural adjustment process; paying special attention to the social sector and the vulnerable groups; manpower development and utilization for the long term; the role of regional, international and nongovernmental organizations.

Title: The Khartoum Declaration, 1988
Author: Anonymous
Year: 1988
Periodical: Rural Progress: Bulletin of the Economic Commission for Africa
Volume: 7
Issue: 1
Pages: 29-35
Language: English
Geographic term: Africa
Abstract: Publication, in two successive issues of ‘Rural Progress’, of the Khartoum Declaration, adopted at the International Conference on the ‘Human dimension of Africa’s economic recovery and development’, held under UN auspices in Khartoum, Sudan, from 5-8 March, 1988, as a sequel to the International Conference on ‘Africa: the challenge of economic recovery and accelerated development’, held in Abuja, Nigeria, in June 1987. The analytical part of the Khartoum Declaration (reproduced in a condensed and slightly edited version) contains an overall assessment of the human condition in Africa and criticizes many structural adjustment programmes for being incomplete, mechanistic and of too short a time perspective. It concludes that the human dimension is the sine qua non of economic recovery. The conclusions and recommendations cover the following topics: incorporating the human factor in the recovery and structural adjustment process; paying special attention to the social sector and the vulnerable groups; manpower development and utilization for the long term; the role of regional, international and nongovernmental organizations.