Continuity and change in Tiv music and dance

The rapid and spectacular evolution of the ‘swange’ music and dance style created in the town of Gboko between 1957 and 1958 by Jerry Ugba has exposed the need to investigate the growth and development of Tiv music and dance since the inception of the colonial era in Nigeria. Tiv music and dance styles can be classified under two broad categories: the sacred and the secular. The sacred, such as the music and dance associated with the ‘akombo’ or spiritual forces propitiated during the ‘ibiamegh’ ceremony, has a tendency to perpetuate itself despite efforts on the part of Christian missionaries to eradicate it. The secular music and dance styles are more dynamic. They seek to incorporate new elements and when a style has become too violent and is banned, as happened in the case of the ‘ange’ when the abusive songs accompanying the dance took on such frenzied forms that the colonial administration feared they would lead to bloodshed, it usually reemerges in a different form. Bibliogr., notes.

Title: Continuity and change in Tiv music and dance
Author: Igoil, Iyortange
Year: 1987
Periodical: Nigeria Magazine
Volume: 55
Issue: 4
Pages: 52-56
Language: English
Geographic term: Nigeria
Abstract: The rapid and spectacular evolution of the ‘swange’ music and dance style created in the town of Gboko between 1957 and 1958 by Jerry Ugba has exposed the need to investigate the growth and development of Tiv music and dance since the inception of the colonial era in Nigeria. Tiv music and dance styles can be classified under two broad categories: the sacred and the secular. The sacred, such as the music and dance associated with the ‘akombo’ or spiritual forces propitiated during the ‘ibiamegh’ ceremony, has a tendency to perpetuate itself despite efforts on the part of Christian missionaries to eradicate it. The secular music and dance styles are more dynamic. They seek to incorporate new elements and when a style has become too violent and is banned, as happened in the case of the ‘ange’ when the abusive songs accompanying the dance took on such frenzied forms that the colonial administration feared they would lead to bloodshed, it usually reemerges in a different form. Bibliogr., notes.