Bureaucratic Elites and Public-Sector Wage Bargaining in Nigeria

Examination of the establishment of independent commissions in Nigeria since 1931 to review wage structures, gradings, and related terms of employment in the public sector. A concise historical analysis is presented of the major wage tribunals in Nigeria, and of the arguments proffered to explain their establishment. The evidence strongly suggests that, although the findings and awards of the wage commissions have hardly promoted industrial harmony, they are likely to persist because they represent the least controversial way of distributing money wages and nonwage benefits, and of allocating coveted positions amongst competing elites in the public sector. Notes, ref.

Title: Bureaucratic Elites and Public-Sector Wage Bargaining in Nigeria
Author: Otobo, Dafe
Year: 1986
Periodical: Journal of Modern African Studies
Volume: 24
Issue: 1
Pages: 101-126
Language: English
Geographic term: Nigeria
External link: https://www.jstor.org/stable/160514
Abstract: Examination of the establishment of independent commissions in Nigeria since 1931 to review wage structures, gradings, and related terms of employment in the public sector. A concise historical analysis is presented of the major wage tribunals in Nigeria, and of the arguments proffered to explain their establishment. The evidence strongly suggests that, although the findings and awards of the wage commissions have hardly promoted industrial harmony, they are likely to persist because they represent the least controversial way of distributing money wages and nonwage benefits, and of allocating coveted positions amongst competing elites in the public sector. Notes, ref.