State, Party, and Revolution in Ethiopia

The Ethiopian Revolution has thus far passed through two major phases of consolidation, and it has just begun to move into a third with the founding of the Workers Party of Ethiopia in September 1984. Each phase has been characterized by new efforts on the part of the Derg to strengthen its authoritative control over the state, thus enhancing its ability to dictate policy. In the process, it has attempted to manage the participation of elements external to the ruling group in the affairs of state. The goal is to have socialism, but a socialism in which this military oligarchic ruling class, not the ‘broad masses’ or progressive civilian intellectuals, has undisputed control. The purpose of this essay is to critically analyze the development of state socialism in Ethiopia. – Notes, ref.

Title: State, Party, and Revolution in Ethiopia
Author: Keller, Edmond J.
Year: 1985
Periodical: African Studies Review
Volume: 28
Issue: 1
Period: March
Pages: 1-17
Language: English
Geographic term: Ethiopia
External link: https://www.jstor.org/stable/524564
Abstract: The Ethiopian Revolution has thus far passed through two major phases of consolidation, and it has just begun to move into a third with the founding of the Workers Party of Ethiopia in September 1984. Each phase has been characterized by new efforts on the part of the Derg to strengthen its authoritative control over the state, thus enhancing its ability to dictate policy. In the process, it has attempted to manage the participation of elements external to the ruling group in the affairs of state. The goal is to have socialism, but a socialism in which this military oligarchic ruling class, not the ‘broad masses’ or progressive civilian intellectuals, has undisputed control. The purpose of this essay is to critically analyze the development of state socialism in Ethiopia. – Notes, ref.