Food Shortages in Africa: A Critique of Existing Agricultural Strategies

After a brief review of the liberal and neo-Marxist explanations of Africa’s development problems, the author examines whether the predominant economic systems in Africa – the private enterprise and the state enterprise systems – are capable of overcoming the current agricultural crisis by alleviating the food sector’s deprivation of needed resources. He argues that the market, by itself, is unable to coordinate resources with social needs and thereby bring about a solution to the food crisis; so interventionist policy should play an important role. When, on the other hand, policy supersedes or complements the market, it needs to represent social needs in order to achieve developmental objectives. Notes, ref.

Title: Food Shortages in Africa: A Critique of Existing Agricultural Strategies
Author: Mengisteab, Kidane
Year: 1985
Periodical: Africa Today
Volume: 32
Issue: 4
Period: 4th Quarter
Pages: 39-53
Language: English
Geographic term: Africa
External link: https://www.jstor.org/stable/4186323
Abstract: After a brief review of the liberal and neo-Marxist explanations of Africa’s development problems, the author examines whether the predominant economic systems in Africa – the private enterprise and the state enterprise systems – are capable of overcoming the current agricultural crisis by alleviating the food sector’s deprivation of needed resources. He argues that the market, by itself, is unable to coordinate resources with social needs and thereby bring about a solution to the food crisis; so interventionist policy should play an important role. When, on the other hand, policy supersedes or complements the market, it needs to represent social needs in order to achieve developmental objectives. Notes, ref.