Monopoly capital and industrial unionism in the South African motor industry

It is within the motor industry that industrial unionism is at its strongest. No union can claim as deep a penetration of their industrial sectors as the NAAWU (National Automobile and Allied Workers’ Union), which now represents about half of all workers in the car industry, is active in all assembly plants and is formally recognized by employers in most. The motor industry has seen concerted, widespread, effective and often coordinated, multi-plant strike activity and NAAWU’s international links are more extensive and sophisticated than those of any other single union. Purpose of the article is to examine how and why these developments have come about. First, it describes the nature of the local industry and outlines the struggles in which black car-workers have been involved. Notes, sum. in French.

Title: Monopoly capital and industrial unionism in the South African motor industry
Author: Southall, Roger
Year: 1985
Periodical: Labour, Capital and Society
Volume: 18
Issue: 2
Pages: 304-342
Language: English
Geographic term: South Africa
Abstract: It is within the motor industry that industrial unionism is at its strongest. No union can claim as deep a penetration of their industrial sectors as the NAAWU (National Automobile and Allied Workers’ Union), which now represents about half of all workers in the car industry, is active in all assembly plants and is formally recognized by employers in most. The motor industry has seen concerted, widespread, effective and often coordinated, multi-plant strike activity and NAAWU’s international links are more extensive and sophisticated than those of any other single union. Purpose of the article is to examine how and why these developments have come about. First, it describes the nature of the local industry and outlines the struggles in which black car-workers have been involved. Notes, sum. in French.