The health consequences of armed conflict in Sub-Saharan Africa: how much do conflict intensity and proximity matter?

Armed conflict affects combatants and noncombatants directly through casualties, but other effects on health are less visible and more difficult to measure. Recent studies in the public health literature and in the comparative social sciences have increasingly reported on the negative effects of armed conflict on health. Most of these studies have relied on aggregate, macro-level data to compare effects between countries, but few have examined the micro-level foundations of this relationship. This study attempts to understand the extent of the effects of armed conflict on individual health and to explore whether conflict intensity and proximity present challenges to health that have not previously been documented. Using individual level survey data, such as from the World Health Survey (WHO) of 2003 and from the Peace Research Institute of Oslo, as well as a measure of self-assessed health improves our understanding of the links between health and armed conflict in subSaharan Africa. App., bibliogr., notes, sum. [Journal abstract]

Title: The health consequences of armed conflict in Sub-Saharan Africa: how much do conflict intensity and proximity matter?
Author: Openshaw, Matthew S.
Year: 2012
Periodical: African Conflict and Peacebuilding Review (ISSN 2156-7263)
Volume: 2
Issue: 1
Pages: 1-30
Language: English
Geographic term: Subsaharan Africa
External link: https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2979/africonfpeacrevi.2.1.1
Abstract: Armed conflict affects combatants and noncombatants directly through casualties, but other effects on health are less visible and more difficult to measure. Recent studies in the public health literature and in the comparative social sciences have increasingly reported on the negative effects of armed conflict on health. Most of these studies have relied on aggregate, macro-level data to compare effects between countries, but few have examined the micro-level foundations of this relationship. This study attempts to understand the extent of the effects of armed conflict on individual health and to explore whether conflict intensity and proximity present challenges to health that have not previously been documented. Using individual level survey data, such as from the World Health Survey (WHO) of 2003 and from the Peace Research Institute of Oslo, as well as a measure of self-assessed health improves our understanding of the links between health and armed conflict in subSaharan Africa. App., bibliogr., notes, sum. [Journal abstract]