Nationalism and communist phobia in colonial Uganda, 1945-1960

By 1959, at the time of the constitutional developments for Uganda’s independence, there was no concrete proof by the colonial administration and the church that there was a communist conspiracy in Uganda; nor was there evidence to show that there was a communist party or communist fellow travellers in that country, though there was enough evidence to show that some nationalists were in contact with the communist world for the purpose of furthering their political activities. Even in the absence of proof of communist influence in Uganda, the colonial government, suspecting UNC (Uganda National Congress) officials of intentions to introduce the communist system in Uganda, persecuted them and hindered the UNC political activities. The government intentionally used the communist scare in Uganda to counteract and to curb the activities of the UNC. Notes.

Title: Nationalism and communist phobia in colonial Uganda, 1945-1960
Author: Mulira, J.
Year: 1983
Periodical: Mawazo
Volume: 5
Issue: 1
Pages: 3-16
Language: English
Geographic term: Uganda
Abstract: By 1959, at the time of the constitutional developments for Uganda’s independence, there was no concrete proof by the colonial administration and the church that there was a communist conspiracy in Uganda; nor was there evidence to show that there was a communist party or communist fellow travellers in that country, though there was enough evidence to show that some nationalists were in contact with the communist world for the purpose of furthering their political activities. Even in the absence of proof of communist influence in Uganda, the colonial government, suspecting UNC (Uganda National Congress) officials of intentions to introduce the communist system in Uganda, persecuted them and hindered the UNC political activities. The government intentionally used the communist scare in Uganda to counteract and to curb the activities of the UNC. Notes.