Zambia’s Economic Reforms and Their Aftermath: The State and the Growth of Indigenous Capital

Both the manner in which existing class forces directly informed state policy and the potentially contradictory effects of this policy package on the indigenous owning class are examined in an analysis of the relation of the state to indigenous capital as revealed by Zambia’s economic reforms and the changes effected thereby in the local economy. This involves consideration of three sets of questions: (1) the extent to which the independent state responded to the direct pressure of petty and small-scale capital; (2) the precise role of the state in furthering the growth of indigenous capital; and (3) the extent to which the emergence of a state capitalist sector has inhibited the expansion of indigenous capital. Notes.

Title: Zambia’s Economic Reforms and Their Aftermath: The State and the Growth of Indigenous Capital
Author: Baylies, Carolyn L.
Year: 1982
Periodical: Journal of Commonwealth and Comparative Politics
Volume: 20
Issue: 3
Period: November
Pages: 235-263
Language: English
Geographic term: Zambia
Abstract: Both the manner in which existing class forces directly informed state policy and the potentially contradictory effects of this policy package on the indigenous owning class are examined in an analysis of the relation of the state to indigenous capital as revealed by Zambia’s economic reforms and the changes effected thereby in the local economy. This involves consideration of three sets of questions: (1) the extent to which the independent state responded to the direct pressure of petty and small-scale capital; (2) the precise role of the state in furthering the growth of indigenous capital; and (3) the extent to which the emergence of a state capitalist sector has inhibited the expansion of indigenous capital. Notes.