Modern Sector Employment and Urban Social Change: A Case Study from Gaborone, Botswana

Focusing on a cross-section of urban migrants with various levels of education in Gaborone, Botswana, the author assesses the key factors influencing the level of migrant integration into the urban community, relying on criteria developed from the work of J.C. Mitchell such as attitude to urban employment, married with spouse present in town, independent with offspring in town, possession of fixed property in the rural area, remittances to the rural household, involvement in town life, and network of relations with rural kinsmen. The author goes on to question the effects of urban integration on the form and strength of the rural-urban link. The types of social organisation among migrants in town are discussed in relation to the migrants’ changing socio-economic relationships with the rural place of origin. Those relationships being preserved and those most under strain are identified and explained. Notes, tab., French sum.

Title: Modern Sector Employment and Urban Social Change: A Case Study from Gaborone, Botswana
Author: Bell, Morag
Year: 1981
Periodical: Canadian Journal of African Studies
Volume: 15
Issue: 2
Pages: 259-276
Language: English
Geographic term: Botswana
External link: https://www.jstor.org/stable/484412
Abstract: Focusing on a cross-section of urban migrants with various levels of education in Gaborone, Botswana, the author assesses the key factors influencing the level of migrant integration into the urban community, relying on criteria developed from the work of J.C. Mitchell such as attitude to urban employment, married with spouse present in town, independent with offspring in town, possession of fixed property in the rural area, remittances to the rural household, involvement in town life, and network of relations with rural kinsmen. The author goes on to question the effects of urban integration on the form and strength of the rural-urban link. The types of social organisation among migrants in town are discussed in relation to the migrants’ changing socio-economic relationships with the rural place of origin. Those relationships being preserved and those most under strain are identified and explained. Notes, tab., French sum.