Notes on a pidgin dialect

The aim of this paper is to point out some of the aspects – and these are minimal – in which Fanakalo as used by Shona-speakers in Zimbabwe differs from the standard in which this pidgin is spoken elsewhere in southern Africa. The variety of Fanakalo spoken on the Zimbabwe mines, with slightly more Ndebele influence is not discussed here Fanakalo is a pidgin having at its base both English and Zulu, the Nguni language from which Ndebele is derived. Although the pidgin is sometimes referred to as Fanakalo, or Fanikalo (with a voiceless velar stop), it is known among Shona-speakersJ most frequently as Chilapalapa (-Chiraparapa) and Chilol (-Chiroro), which may be rendered as the lapa-lapa or lo-lo language, because of the frequency with which the particle lapa ‘here, there, in, on, at, out’ and the determiner lo ‘the, a, this, that’ occur. The Fanakalo spoken by the Shona is referred to here as Chilapalapa, to distinguish it from the standard, which is designated as Fanakalo. Bibliogr., notes.

Title: Notes on a pidgin dialect
Author: Ferraz, L.
Year: 1980
Periodical: African Studies
Volume: 39
Issue: 2
Pages: 209-220
Language: English
Geographic term: Zimbabwe
External link: https://doi.org/10.1080/00020188008707560
Abstract: The aim of this paper is to point out some of the aspects – and these are minimal – in which Fanakalo as used by Shona-speakers in Zimbabwe differs from the standard in which this pidgin is spoken elsewhere in southern Africa. The variety of Fanakalo spoken on the Zimbabwe mines, with slightly more Ndebele influence is not discussed here Fanakalo is a pidgin having at its base both English and Zulu, the Nguni language from which Ndebele is derived. Although the pidgin is sometimes referred to as Fanakalo, or Fanikalo (with a voiceless velar stop), it is known among Shona-speakersJ most frequently as Chilapalapa (-Chiraparapa) and Chilol (-Chiroro), which may be rendered as the lapa-lapa or lo-lo language, because of the frequency with which the particle lapa ‘here, there, in, on, at, out’ and the determiner lo ‘the, a, this, that’ occur. The Fanakalo spoken by the Shona is referred to here as Chilapalapa, to distinguish it from the standard, which is designated as Fanakalo. Bibliogr., notes.