The legislative process in a military regime: the Nigerian experience

Absolute separation of powers prescribed by Montesquieu did not apply to the Nigerian situation prior to 1966 because of its parliamentary type of Executive. The merger of legislative and executive functions in the same body as has been the case since the Federal Military Government took power in 1966 does not necessarily mean tyranny or a total disregard of the rule of law. This is the tenor of this article. Sections: Introduction – The new legislative process and the rule of law – Legislative process under Nigeria’s parliamentary system of government – Legislative arrangements under the military regime – Evolution of policy into law – Discussion of legislative proposals in council – Collective responsibility for legislative decision – Conclusion. Notes.

Title: The legislative process in a military regime: the Nigerian experience
Author: Olowu, E.O.
Year: 1976
Periodical: Quarterly Journal of Administration
Volume: 11
Issue: 1-2
Pages: 3-20
Language: English
Geographic term: Nigeria
Abstract: Absolute separation of powers prescribed by Montesquieu did not apply to the Nigerian situation prior to 1966 because of its parliamentary type of Executive. The merger of legislative and executive functions in the same body as has been the case since the Federal Military Government took power in 1966 does not necessarily mean tyranny or a total disregard of the rule of law. This is the tenor of this article. Sections: Introduction – The new legislative process and the rule of law – Legislative process under Nigeria’s parliamentary system of government – Legislative arrangements under the military regime – Evolution of policy into law – Discussion of legislative proposals in council – Collective responsibility for legislative decision – Conclusion. Notes.