Education and ethnicity in the Rift Valley: Masai, Kipsigis and Kikuyu in the school System

Since it was clear that vast areas of the Whith Highlands in the Rift Valley Province would go back to Africans, population movement has been most marked into te old white reserves, but also a move of people into some of the more thinly populated African areas namely districts that were ‘closed’ or protected during the colonial period and for the first seven years of the independence government. Focus of this paper is the educational impact of this population movement upon the schools of two districts in The Rift Valley, Harok and Kajiado. The schools in the area (Masailand) are thought of as Masai, but are in fact inter-tribal institutions Within the local political structure they are regarded as district Masai schools, and local government councils employ a number of techniques to encourage and expand Masai representation. Sections: Composition of Masai schools – Aspirations in an intertribal school system – Inter-ethnic education patterns outside Masailand – Conclusion. Notes, tables.

Title: Education and ethnicity in the Rift Valley: Masai, Kipsigis and Kikuyu in the school System
Author: King, K.
Year: 1975
Periodical: Education in Eastern Africa
Volume: 5
Issue: 2
Pages: 197-217
Language: English
Geographic term: Kenya
Abstract: Since it was clear that vast areas of the Whith Highlands in the Rift Valley Province would go back to Africans, population movement has been most marked into te old white reserves, but also a move of people into some of the more thinly populated African areas namely districts that were ‘closed’ or protected during the colonial period and for the first seven years of the independence government. Focus of this paper is the educational impact of this population movement upon the schools of two districts in The Rift Valley, Harok and Kajiado. The schools in the area (Masailand) are thought of as Masai, but are in fact inter-tribal institutions Within the local political structure they are regarded as district Masai schools, and local government councils employ a number of techniques to encourage and expand Masai representation. Sections: Composition of Masai schools – Aspirations in an intertribal school system – Inter-ethnic education patterns outside Masailand – Conclusion. Notes, tables.