Jonas Mohamed Bath and the Free Mandingos in Trinidad: The Question of Repatriation to Africa, 1831-1838

Bath, taken to Trinidad in 1804 or 1805, claimed to be Sultan of Yulliallhad Alimant. He was a Moslem priest and was regarded, not only by the Mandingos, but by all Africans who were Moslems in Trinidad, as chief priest and patriarch. Among the slaves and free blacks in Port of Spain, co-operative societies and groups, a characteristic feature of West African communities, were formed. Bath formed the Mandingo Society in Port of Spain. The article describes the public bids of this Society to the British government to return them to West Africa. Notes.

Title: Jonas Mohamed Bath and the Free Mandingos in Trinidad: The Question of Repatriation to Africa, 1831-1838
Author: Campbell, Carl
Year: 1974
Periodical: Pan-African Journal
Volume: 7
Issue: 2
Period: Summer
Pages: 129-152
Language: English
Geographic terms: Trinidad and Tobago
West Africa
Africa
Abstract: Bath, taken to Trinidad in 1804 or 1805, claimed to be Sultan of Yulliallhad Alimant. He was a Moslem priest and was regarded, not only by the Mandingos, but by all Africans who were Moslems in Trinidad, as chief priest and patriarch. Among the slaves and free blacks in Port of Spain, co-operative societies and groups, a characteristic feature of West African communities, were formed. Bath formed the Mandingo Society in Port of Spain. The article describes the public bids of this Society to the British government to return them to West Africa. Notes.