Asians in East Africa: the case of Kenya

This article examines the events that have led the Africans and the Asians to a situation of (racial) conflict and evaluates the Asian-African relationship from the African point of view. The events leading to the implementation of the Arusha Declaration, the Immigration and Trade Licensing Bills in Kenya, and the expulsion of Asian aliens from Uganda make it imperative to look beyond the Indian interpretation of their history in East Africa. This article seeks to answer such questions as: How did the Asians come to East Africa? What was their role and position in the precolonial period? What has been their role in the colonial era (especially in Kenya)? How did the Asian’s high ranking social, political, and economic position impede his interaction with the Africans? How did this position develop during the colonial era while at the same time sowing the seeds of the present dilemma? What corrective measures have been taken by Africans since independence? Why have those measures failed to solve the problem? Notes.

Title: Asians in East Africa: the case of Kenya
Author: Nyaggah, Mougo
Year: 1974
Periodical: Journal of African Studies (UCLA)
Volume: 1
Issue: 2
Pages: 205-233
Language: English
Geographic term: Kenya
Subject: Indians
Abstract: This article examines the events that have led the Africans and the Asians to a situation of (racial) conflict and evaluates the Asian-African relationship from the African point of view. The events leading to the implementation of the Arusha Declaration, the Immigration and Trade Licensing Bills in Kenya, and the expulsion of Asian aliens from Uganda make it imperative to look beyond the Indian interpretation of their history in East Africa. This article seeks to answer such questions as: How did the Asians come to East Africa? What was their role and position in the precolonial period? What has been their role in the colonial era (especially in Kenya)? How did the Asian’s high ranking social, political, and economic position impede his interaction with the Africans? How did this position develop during the colonial era while at the same time sowing the seeds of the present dilemma? What corrective measures have been taken by Africans since independence? Why have those measures failed to solve the problem? Notes.