The Coloured Policy of South Africa: Parallelism as a Socio-Political Device to Regulate White-Coloured Integration

In government and National Party circles there is a growing conviction that the Coloureds can no longer be placated with theoretical solutions and so there is a quest for a Coloured policy which is both ‘workable’ and ‘moral’. This quest is the basic force behind the policy of parallel development. Basically parallelism implies the rejection of deliberate integration, but the Coloureds are promised separate nationhood, paralleling that of the White nation. However, whereas the government could in the case of the Bantu meet the conditions of non-integration and non-domination by geographically separating the Bantu from the Whites, today it is accepted government policy that the ‘Coloured problem’ is incapable of a geographical solution. The Coloured policy is discussed in the following sections: Parallel development in the current circumstances of S.A. Parallelism: a compromise between apartheid and integration? – The political future of the Coloureds. Notes.

Title: The Coloured Policy of South Africa: Parallelism as a Socio-Political Device to Regulate White-Coloured Integration
Author: Rhoodie, N.J.
Year: 1973
Periodical: African Affairs: The Journal of the Royal African Society
Volume: 72
Issue: 286
Period: January
Pages: 46-56
Language: English
Geographic term: South Africa
External link: https://www.jstor.org/stable/720582
Abstract: In government and National Party circles there is a growing conviction that the Coloureds can no longer be placated with theoretical solutions and so there is a quest for a Coloured policy which is both ‘workable’ and ‘moral’. This quest is the basic force behind the policy of parallel development. Basically parallelism implies the rejection of deliberate integration, but the Coloureds are promised separate nationhood, paralleling that of the White nation. However, whereas the government could in the case of the Bantu meet the conditions of non-integration and non-domination by geographically separating the Bantu from the Whites, today it is accepted government policy that the ‘Coloured problem’ is incapable of a geographical solution. The Coloured policy is discussed in the following sections: Parallel development in the current circumstances of S.A. Parallelism: a compromise between apartheid and integration? – The political future of the Coloureds. Notes.