Conference of heads of state and government of West Africa (Monrovia, 17-24 April 1968)

The conference was attended by the Presidents of Guinea, Liberia, Mali, Mauritania, Upper Volta, Senegal, the Prime Minister of the Gambia, the representative of the Chairman of the National Liberation Council of Ghana, the representative of the Head of the Federal Military Government of Nigeria. The initiative had been taken by the Heads of the Senegal River Basin States (Guinea, Mali, Mauritania, Senegal) following their meetings at Nouakchott (1965) and Bamako (1967). Result was the establishment of a West African Regional Group of 9 out of the 14 countries of the sub-region. The articles of association for the establishment of an Economic Community of West Africa (signed Accra 1967 by all the 14 states except Guinea) were made an integral part of the Monrovia protocol. Described are the institutional consequences of this regional grouping and the lines along which economic co-operation is likely to be achieved.

Title: Conference of heads of state and government of West Africa (Monrovia, 17-24 April 1968)
Author: Mensah, J.H.
Year: 1968
Periodical: Journal of Modern African Studies
Volume: 6
Issue: 3
Pages: 419-420
Language: English
Geographic term: West Africa
External link: https://www.jstor.org/stable/159310
Abstract: The conference was attended by the Presidents of Guinea, Liberia, Mali, Mauritania, Upper Volta, Senegal, the Prime Minister of the Gambia, the representative of the Chairman of the National Liberation Council of Ghana, the representative of the Head of the Federal Military Government of Nigeria. The initiative had been taken by the Heads of the Senegal River Basin States (Guinea, Mali, Mauritania, Senegal) following their meetings at Nouakchott (1965) and Bamako (1967). Result was the establishment of a West African Regional Group of 9 out of the 14 countries of the sub-region. The articles of association for the establishment of an Economic Community of West Africa (signed Accra 1967 by all the 14 states except Guinea) were made an integral part of the Monrovia protocol. Described are the institutional consequences of this regional grouping and the lines along which economic co-operation is likely to be achieved.