Making sense of borders

This special issue contains 5 papers presented at the XV South African Sociological Association (SASA) Congress (University of the Witwatersrand, 28 June-2 July 2009). The theme of the congress, Making Sense of Borders, was formulated in response to acts of xenophobic violence in South Africa, particularly heinous in May/June 2008, motivating the organizers to highlight the question of borders – between nation-States, between migrants and South Africans, between ‘foreigners’ and South Africans, between ‘locals’ and ‘citizens’, between those with access to services and those without, and between men and women. The papers highlight a range of types of borders as well as different processes by which borders are constructed. While only one of the articles deals specifically with xenophobia in South Africa, they all address issues related to borders and boundaries, race and class, belonging, identity and citizenship. The articles confront constructions of (and ruptures in) social and collective identity; class, ethnic/racial, and gender inequalities; boundaries created through knowledge production dominated by particular groups; and communities, national identities and spatial boundaries. Four of the five articles discuss the role of the State, in constructing borders and boundaries, in contesting borders or in implementing border controls. The articles range from the local – in examinations of different border/identity constructions in Durban and Stellenbosch, to the national – in discussions of South African conceptions of citizenship, new social movements in the country, and the small but diverse communities of Chinese, to the regional and global – in the 2009 World Social Forum (WSF) and the global alter-globalization movement. Contents: Introduction: Identity, Citizenship and Power in South Africa (Yoon Jung Park) – Viewed from the Past, the Future of South African Citizenship (Jonathan Klaaren) – ‘We Would Have No Name’: The Porosity of Locational and Racial Identities Amongst the ‘Coloured Communities’ of Stellenbosch, c. 1890-1960s (Chet J.P. Fransch) – Between the Push and the Shove: Everyday Struggles and the Re-making of Durban (Ashwin Desai) – Subaltern Sexiness: From a Politics of Representation to a Politics of Difference (Prishani Naidoo) – Boundaries, Borders and Borderland Constructions: Chinese in Contemporary South Africa and the Region (Yoon Jung Park). [ASC Leiden abstract]

Title: Making sense of borders
Editor: Park, Yoon Jung
Year: 2010
Periodical: African Studies (ISSN 1469-2872)
Volume: 69
Issue: 3
Pages: 379-479
Language: English
Geographic term: South Africa
External link: https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/cast20/69/3
Abstract: This special issue contains 5 papers presented at the XV South African Sociological Association (SASA) Congress (University of the Witwatersrand, 28 June-2 July 2009). The theme of the congress, Making Sense of Borders, was formulated in response to acts of xenophobic violence in South Africa, particularly heinous in May/June 2008, motivating the organizers to highlight the question of borders – between nation-States, between migrants and South Africans, between ‘foreigners’ and South Africans, between ‘locals’ and ‘citizens’, between those with access to services and those without, and between men and women. The papers highlight a range of types of borders as well as different processes by which borders are constructed. While only one of the articles deals specifically with xenophobia in South Africa, they all address issues related to borders and boundaries, race and class, belonging, identity and citizenship. The articles confront constructions of (and ruptures in) social and collective identity; class, ethnic/racial, and gender inequalities; boundaries created through knowledge production dominated by particular groups; and communities, national identities and spatial boundaries. Four of the five articles discuss the role of the State, in constructing borders and boundaries, in contesting borders or in implementing border controls. The articles range from the local – in examinations of different border/identity constructions in Durban and Stellenbosch, to the national – in discussions of South African conceptions of citizenship, new social movements in the country, and the small but diverse communities of Chinese, to the regional and global – in the 2009 World Social Forum (WSF) and the global alter-globalization movement. Contents: Introduction: Identity, Citizenship and Power in South Africa (Yoon Jung Park) – Viewed from the Past, the Future of South African Citizenship (Jonathan Klaaren) – ‘We Would Have No Name’: The Porosity of Locational and Racial Identities Amongst the ‘Coloured Communities’ of Stellenbosch, c. 1890-1960s (Chet J.P. Fransch) – Between the Push and the Shove: Everyday Struggles and the Re-making of Durban (Ashwin Desai) – Subaltern Sexiness: From a Politics of Representation to a Politics of Difference (Prishani Naidoo) – Boundaries, Borders and Borderland Constructions: Chinese in Contemporary South Africa and the Region (Yoon Jung Park). [ASC Leiden abstract]