Postcolonial archaeologies in Africa

This volume pulls the veil from previous representations of African archaeology to show that archaeologists working in Africa are still very much in the grip of patronage systems planted during the colonial era, marginalizing young innovative African archaeologists. Based on a seminar on postcolonial archaeology held in Florida in 2007, the book presents cutting-edge proposals for how archaeology in Africa today can be made more relevant to the needs of local communities. Contributions: What is postcolonial about archaeologies in Africa? (Peter R. Schmidt); Archaeologies of disenchantment (Jonathan R. Walz); The atomic model view of society: application in studies of the African past (Felix A. Chami); Practicing postcolonial archaeology in Eastern Africa from the United States (Chapurukha M. Kusimba); Toward recognition of the right to a cultural past in the twenty-first century: an example from East Africa (Karega-Munene); Postcolonial silencing and the State: perspectives from Eritrea (Peter R. Schmidt); Barons, Anglo-Saxons, and nos anctres – or, Eating the young in francophone West Africa (Roderick J. McIntosh); Worldviews, mind-sets, and trajectories in West African archaeology (Augustin F.C. Holl); Africa on display: curating postcolonial pasts in the Cameroon Grassfields (Michael Rowlands); Between indigene and citizen: locating the politics of the past in postcolonial southern Africa (Alinah K. Segobye); Decolonizing the mind-set: South African archaeology in a postcolonial, post-apartheid era (Ndukuyakhe Ndlovu); Embracing many voices as keepers of the past (Flordeliz T. Bugarin); ‘Everybody here is all mixed up’: postcolonial encounters with the past at Bosutswe, Botswana (James Denbow and Morongwa Mosothwane, assisted by Nonofho Mathibidi Ndobochani); Reworking African(ist) archaeology in the postcolonial period: a sociocultural anthropologist’s perspective (Faye V. Harrison). [ASC Leiden abstract]

Title: Postcolonial archaeologies in Africa
Editor: Schmidt, Peter Ridgway
Year: 2009
Pages: 287
Language: English
City of publisher: Santa Fe
Publisher: School for Advanced Research Press
ISBN: 1930618085; 9781930618084
Geographic terms: Africa
Botswana
Cameroon
Eritrea
Kenya
South Africa
Abstract: This volume pulls the veil from previous representations of African archaeology to show that archaeologists working in Africa are still very much in the grip of patronage systems planted during the colonial era, marginalizing young innovative African archaeologists. Based on a seminar on postcolonial archaeology held in Florida in 2007, the book presents cutting-edge proposals for how archaeology in Africa today can be made more relevant to the needs of local communities. Contributions: What is postcolonial about archaeologies in Africa? (Peter R. Schmidt); Archaeologies of disenchantment (Jonathan R. Walz); The atomic model view of society: application in studies of the African past (Felix A. Chami); Practicing postcolonial archaeology in Eastern Africa from the United States (Chapurukha M. Kusimba); Toward recognition of the right to a cultural past in the twenty-first century: an example from East Africa (Karega-Munene); Postcolonial silencing and the State: perspectives from Eritrea (Peter R. Schmidt); Barons, Anglo-Saxons, and nos anctres – or, Eating the young in francophone West Africa (Roderick J. McIntosh); Worldviews, mind-sets, and trajectories in West African archaeology (Augustin F.C. Holl); Africa on display: curating postcolonial pasts in the Cameroon Grassfields (Michael Rowlands); Between indigene and citizen: locating the politics of the past in postcolonial southern Africa (Alinah K. Segobye); Decolonizing the mind-set: South African archaeology in a postcolonial, post-apartheid era (Ndukuyakhe Ndlovu); Embracing many voices as keepers of the past (Flordeliz T. Bugarin); ‘Everybody here is all mixed up’: postcolonial encounters with the past at Bosutswe, Botswana (James Denbow and Morongwa Mosothwane, assisted by Nonofho Mathibidi Ndobochani); Reworking African(ist) archaeology in the postcolonial period: a sociocultural anthropologist’s perspective (Faye V. Harrison). [ASC Leiden abstract]