Special issue: The power of water: landscape, water and the state in Southern and Eastern Africa

The papers in this special issue were presented at the annual conference of the Centre of African Studies of the University of Edinburgh held on 28 and 29 March, 2007, and entitled ‘The power of water: landscape, water and the State in southern and eastern Africa’, Following the introduction by Joost Fontein, papers are included on water politics and development in Zimbabwe (Gerald Chikozho Mazarire); traditions of origin and ownership of riverside lands on the Kavango river, Namibia (Meredith McKittrick); fishing practices on Lake Malawi (Setsuko Nakayama); controlling and medicalizing a mining environment near the Luanshya River on Zambia’s Copperbelt (Lyn Schumaker); the development of a piped-water scheme in Kilimanjaro (Tanzania) during ‘Ujaama’ in 1961-1985 (Matthew V. Bender); State authority over Lake Kariba (Zimbabwe) and the attitudes of Tonga fishermen (JoAnn McGregor); conflicts over water provision in Bulawayo, Zimbabwe, from 1894 to 1924 (Muchaparara Musemwa); prepaid water meters, the history of its technology and neoliberal reforms in South Africa (Antina von Schnitzler); water policy and collective action in Durban, South Africa (Buntu Siwisa). By way of epilogue, David Mosse places the regionally focused papers into a comparative context. [ASC Leiden abstract]

Title: Special issue: The power of water: landscape, water and the state in Southern and Eastern Africa
Editors: Fontein, Joost
Marsland, Rebecca
McGregor, JoAnn
Year: 2008
Periodical: Journal of Southern African Studies (ISSN 1465-3893)
Volume: 34
Issue: 4
Pages: 737-988
Language: English
Geographic terms: Malawi
Namibia
South Africa
Tanzania
Zambia
Zimbabwe
External link: https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/cjss20/34/4
Abstract: The papers in this special issue were presented at the annual conference of the Centre of African Studies of the University of Edinburgh held on 28 and 29 March, 2007, and entitled ‘The power of water: landscape, water and the State in southern and eastern Africa’, Following the introduction by Joost Fontein, papers are included on water politics and development in Zimbabwe (Gerald Chikozho Mazarire); traditions of origin and ownership of riverside lands on the Kavango river, Namibia (Meredith McKittrick); fishing practices on Lake Malawi (Setsuko Nakayama); controlling and medicalizing a mining environment near the Luanshya River on Zambia’s Copperbelt (Lyn Schumaker); the development of a piped-water scheme in Kilimanjaro (Tanzania) during ‘Ujaama’ in 1961-1985 (Matthew V. Bender); State authority over Lake Kariba (Zimbabwe) and the attitudes of Tonga fishermen (JoAnn McGregor); conflicts over water provision in Bulawayo, Zimbabwe, from 1894 to 1924 (Muchaparara Musemwa); prepaid water meters, the history of its technology and neoliberal reforms in South Africa (Antina von Schnitzler); water policy and collective action in Durban, South Africa (Buntu Siwisa). By way of epilogue, David Mosse places the regionally focused papers into a comparative context. [ASC Leiden abstract]