The politics of digital initiatives concerning Africa

This issue of ‘Innovation’ focuses on a Workshop on the Politics of Digital Initiatives concerning Africa, held at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign on August 4-5, 2006. Sixteen librarians, academics, project directors and foundation representatives from the US and South Africa came together to discuss key themes in panels on the expropriation of African resources, free and universal access to information, partnerships between US and African institutions, and the politics of digital projects concerning Africa. Also discussed was the relevance of two documents in relation to these issues: the ‘Archives-Libraries Committee Resolution on Migrated Archives’ 1977) and the ‘Guidelines of the African Studies Association for Members’ Ethical Conduct in Research and Other Professional Undertakings in Africa’ (2005) which are included in the issue. The issue contains a summary of workshop issues and decisions by David Easterbrook, an overview by Al Kagan, and papers on content selection issues in digitizing material on South Africa’s freedom struggle (Christopher Sanders); the politics of digital ‘reform and revolution’ (Peter Limb); digitization, postcoloniality and archives of the liberation struggles in southern Africa (Premesh Lalu); how Internet-centric projects can stress African universities (Cliff Missen); and digital content licences in South Africa (Charles Masango). [ASC Leiden abstract]

Title: The politics of digital initiatives concerning Africa
Editor: Kagan, Al
Year: 2007
Periodical: Innovation: Journal of Appropriate Librarianship and Information Work in Southern Africa (ISSN 1025-8892)
Issue: 34
Pages: 77
Language: English
Geographic terms: Africa
South Africa
Abstract: This issue of ‘Innovation’ focuses on a Workshop on the Politics of Digital Initiatives concerning Africa, held at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign on August 4-5, 2006. Sixteen librarians, academics, project directors and foundation representatives from the US and South Africa came together to discuss key themes in panels on the expropriation of African resources, free and universal access to information, partnerships between US and African institutions, and the politics of digital projects concerning Africa. Also discussed was the relevance of two documents in relation to these issues: the ‘Archives-Libraries Committee Resolution on Migrated Archives’ 1977) and the ‘Guidelines of the African Studies Association for Members’ Ethical Conduct in Research and Other Professional Undertakings in Africa’ (2005) which are included in the issue. The issue contains a summary of workshop issues and decisions by David Easterbrook, an overview by Al Kagan, and papers on content selection issues in digitizing material on South Africa’s freedom struggle (Christopher Sanders); the politics of digital ‘reform and revolution’ (Peter Limb); digitization, postcoloniality and archives of the liberation struggles in southern Africa (Premesh Lalu); how Internet-centric projects can stress African universities (Cliff Missen); and digital content licences in South Africa (Charles Masango). [ASC Leiden abstract]