Leadership fatalism and underdevelopment in Nigeria: imaginative policymaking for human development

Looking at the development policies of Nigerian governments there is evidence that Nigerian leaders exhibit a fatalistic orientation – they feel hopeless and act helpless when confronted with problems of critical national importance -, have a dependent mentality and lack a sense of personal or group self-efficacy. They tow the line of least difficulty and least challenge, seek and implement short-term and palliative solutions, and depend on, and outsource complex national problems to, international outsiders without first exploring all domestic possibilities. Consequently, their collective leadership style continues to stall the country’s development. The author illustrates his argument with some recent examples and concludes with an examination of how Nigerian policymakers can improve this situation. Bibliogr., ref. [ASC Leiden abstract]

Title: Leadership fatalism and underdevelopment in Nigeria: imaginative policymaking for human development
Author: Ukaegbu, Chikwendu Christian
Year: 2007
Periodical: Philosophia Africana: Analysis of Philosophy and Issues in Africa and the Black Diaspora
Volume: 10
Issue: 2
Pages: 161-182
Language: English
Geographic term: Nigeria
Abstract: Looking at the development policies of Nigerian governments there is evidence that Nigerian leaders exhibit a fatalistic orientation – they feel hopeless and act helpless when confronted with problems of critical national importance -, have a dependent mentality and lack a sense of personal or group self-efficacy. They tow the line of least difficulty and least challenge, seek and implement short-term and palliative solutions, and depend on, and outsource complex national problems to, international outsiders without first exploring all domestic possibilities. Consequently, their collective leadership style continues to stall the country’s development. The author illustrates his argument with some recent examples and concludes with an examination of how Nigerian policymakers can improve this situation. Bibliogr., ref. [ASC Leiden abstract]