Crooks, Commuters and Chiefs: Home and Belonging in a Border Zone in Pafuri, Gaza Province, Mozambique

Pafuri is a border zone in Gaza province, Mozambique, situated close to the Kruger National Park in the Limpopo (formerly Northern) province of South Africa. Many Tsonga-speaking communities in the Limpopo province, and particularly the Maluleke, share clan linkages with kin on the Mozambique side of the border. Residents of the Pafuri area, as well as people in neighbouring countries, continually view Pafuri, and the larger area of Gaza province in particular, as a space closely connected to their notions of ‘home’, or of ancestral belonging, despite the high levels of rootlessness and upheaval that have characterized the area for decades. This paper focuses on the socioeconomic and historical patterns of place and identity in the Pafuri triangle (or Crookes Corner) in Mozambique. It examines some of the historical events and images which have shaped the identity of the area, such as the decades of war, repatriation and resettlement which have affected residents in both South Africa and Mozambique; the general phenomenon of rootlessness in Mozambique itself, and how local inhabitants have coped with relocation, continual physical movement and transference across border zones; and local patterns of leadership and authority and the ways in which Mozambicans have responded to and circumvented the imposition of State power in Mozambique and the economic laws of migrancy in South Africa. Bibliogr., notes, ref.

Title: Crooks, Commuters and Chiefs: Home and Belonging in a Border Zone in Pafuri, Gaza Province, Mozambique
Author: Connor, Teresa K.
Year: 2003
Periodical: Journal of Contemporary African Studies
Volume: 21
Issue: 1
Period: January
Pages: 93-120
Language: English
Geographic terms: Mozambique
South Africa
External links: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1080/02589000305455
http://ejournals.ebsco.com/direct.asp?ArticleID=TYEQK84502HPUJEJ95TN
Abstract: Pafuri is a border zone in Gaza province, Mozambique, situated close to the Kruger National Park in the Limpopo (formerly Northern) province of South Africa. Many Tsonga-speaking communities in the Limpopo province, and particularly the Maluleke, share clan linkages with kin on the Mozambique side of the border. Residents of the Pafuri area, as well as people in neighbouring countries, continually view Pafuri, and the larger area of Gaza province in particular, as a space closely connected to their notions of ‘home’, or of ancestral belonging, despite the high levels of rootlessness and upheaval that have characterized the area for decades. This paper focuses on the socioeconomic and historical patterns of place and identity in the Pafuri triangle (or Crookes Corner) in Mozambique. It examines some of the historical events and images which have shaped the identity of the area, such as the decades of war, repatriation and resettlement which have affected residents in both South Africa and Mozambique; the general phenomenon of rootlessness in Mozambique itself, and how local inhabitants have coped with relocation, continual physical movement and transference across border zones; and local patterns of leadership and authority and the ways in which Mozambicans have responded to and circumvented the imposition of State power in Mozambique and the economic laws of migrancy in South Africa. Bibliogr., notes, ref.