Factors of labour mobility in the manufacturing sector in Nigeria

This paper analyses the factors of labour mobility in Nigeria’s manufacturing sector by examining the forms of mobility among manufacturing workers, worker job tenure, retrenchment and voluntary withdrawal in relation to prevailing employment opportunities. The paper uses data on the mobility experience of 708 manufacturing workers sampled from 36 companies in Lagos and Kaduna. The analysis shows that labour mobility is restricted geographically along regional lines. Furthermore, the workers demonstrate significant adjustment of career objectives. About 80 percent of worker mobility from previous jobs to current ones was largely voluntary and motivated by economic considerations (e.g. better payment, better conditions of service and improved prospects for upgrading skills and promotion). An analysis of worker mobility in relation to worker perception shows that employment opportunities have deteriorated. The perceived deterioration in employment opportunities appears to have significant implications for adjustment of career aspirations and increased length of job tenure. In essence, the paper shows that labour mobility is directly related to how employment opportunities are perceived by the workers in the labour market. Bibliogr., sum. [Journal abstract, edited]

Title: Factors of labour mobility in the manufacturing sector in Nigeria
Authors: Adebayo, A.A.
Oladeji, S.I.
Year: 2001
Periodical: The Nigerian Journal of Economic and Social Studies
Volume: 43
Issue: 2
Pages: 239-254
Language: English
Geographic term: Nigeria
Abstract: This paper analyses the factors of labour mobility in Nigeria’s manufacturing sector by examining the forms of mobility among manufacturing workers, worker job tenure, retrenchment and voluntary withdrawal in relation to prevailing employment opportunities. The paper uses data on the mobility experience of 708 manufacturing workers sampled from 36 companies in Lagos and Kaduna. The analysis shows that labour mobility is restricted geographically along regional lines. Furthermore, the workers demonstrate significant adjustment of career objectives. About 80 percent of worker mobility from previous jobs to current ones was largely voluntary and motivated by economic considerations (e.g. better payment, better conditions of service and improved prospects for upgrading skills and promotion). An analysis of worker mobility in relation to worker perception shows that employment opportunities have deteriorated. The perceived deterioration in employment opportunities appears to have significant implications for adjustment of career aspirations and increased length of job tenure. In essence, the paper shows that labour mobility is directly related to how employment opportunities are perceived by the workers in the labour market. Bibliogr., sum. [Journal abstract, edited]