South Africa’s Agenda in the 21st Century Global Governance

It is by now evident that economic ‘globalization’ – by which is generally meant free flows of trade, finance and direct investment, under conditions of overwhelming transnational corporate power, underpinned by a system of global embryonic-State institutions based mainly in Washington – simply does not work for South Africa, or Africa. For that reason, President Mbeki and his closest colleagues claim to be reforming the inter-State and embryonic world-State system. Using excerpts from Mbeki’s speeches the present author shows that Mbeki’s approach to engage the global ruling elite is not about personal self-advancement, but about the continuation of what he terms the South African ‘revolution’. However, the reform strategy will fail, because of the very project of global-reformism itself, namely, its underlying philosophy, inappropriate practical strategies, and ineffectual tactics. Central to Mbeki’s strategy is whom he most comfortably allies with. Bibliogr.

Title: South Africa’s Agenda in the 21st Century Global Governance
Author: Bond, Patrick
Year: 2001
Periodical: Review of African Political Economy
Volume: 28
Issue: 89
Period: September
Pages: 415-428
Language: English
Geographic term: South Africa
External links: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1080/03056240108704549
http://ejournals.ebsco.com/direct.asp?ArticleID=4E50BC9D8D50028CE9C2
Abstract: It is by now evident that economic ‘globalization’ – by which is generally meant free flows of trade, finance and direct investment, under conditions of overwhelming transnational corporate power, underpinned by a system of global embryonic-State institutions based mainly in Washington – simply does not work for South Africa, or Africa. For that reason, President Mbeki and his closest colleagues claim to be reforming the inter-State and embryonic world-State system. Using excerpts from Mbeki’s speeches the present author shows that Mbeki’s approach to engage the global ruling elite is not about personal self-advancement, but about the continuation of what he terms the South African ‘revolution’. However, the reform strategy will fail, because of the very project of global-reformism itself, namely, its underlying philosophy, inappropriate practical strategies, and ineffectual tactics. Central to Mbeki’s strategy is whom he most comfortably allies with. Bibliogr.