Unconventional Political Participation and Political Confidence in South Africa: A Longitudinal Analysis Using Data from the World Values Study

The World Values Survey (WVS) is a worldwide longitudinal study of sociocultural and political change, coordinated at the Institute of Social Research at the University of Michigan. South Africa participated in the survey in 1981, 1990, 1995 and 2001. Using data from the survey, the author charts differences in the attitudes to political protest and major State institutions in South Africa across the twenty-year period 1981-2001. The WVS data reveal high levels of support for protest politics among black South Africans, but low levels of support amongst white, coloured and Indian South Africans. Confidence in State institutions was very low among black people at the outset, but rose steadily. Among white people, confidence was initially high, but declined steadily. Among coloured and Indian people, it rose to 1990 but later surveys showed a clear decline. Bibliogr., notes, ref. [ASC Leiden abstract]

Title: Unconventional Political Participation and Political Confidence in South Africa: A Longitudinal Analysis Using Data from the World Values Study
Author: Kotze, Hennie J.
Year: 2001
Periodical: Social Dynamics
Volume: 27
Issue: 2
Period: Winter
Pages: 134-155
Language: English
Geographic term: South Africa
External link: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1080/02533950108458716
Abstract: The World Values Survey (WVS) is a worldwide longitudinal study of sociocultural and political change, coordinated at the Institute of Social Research at the University of Michigan. South Africa participated in the survey in 1981, 1990, 1995 and 2001. Using data from the survey, the author charts differences in the attitudes to political protest and major State institutions in South Africa across the twenty-year period 1981-2001. The WVS data reveal high levels of support for protest politics among black South Africans, but low levels of support amongst white, coloured and Indian South Africans. Confidence in State institutions was very low among black people at the outset, but rose steadily. Among white people, confidence was initially high, but declined steadily. Among coloured and Indian people, it rose to 1990 but later surveys showed a clear decline. Bibliogr., notes, ref. [ASC Leiden abstract]