The politics of liberation in the southern Sudan 1967-1972: the role of Israel, African heads of State, and foreign mercenaries

The civil war in the Sudan (1955-1972) is one of Africa’s longest and most devastating wars. The enlistment of foreign powers in the affairs of the Sudan shaped the magnitude and trend of this war. For example, the former Soviet Union provided financial and military assistance to the Sudan government. In this context, the people of southern Sudan began to seek financial, moral and military support from countries in sub-Saharan Africa, and other nations that were sympathetic to their liberation struggle. African leaders, including Milton Obote, Idi Amin (both Uganda), Jomo Kenyatta (Kenya), Mobutu Sese Seko (Zaire) and Haile Selassie (Emperor of Ethiopia), became involved in the Sudanese conflict for geopolitical and humanitarian reasons. On the other hand, Israel and soldiers of fortune rendered a helping hand to the southern Sudanese rebels (the Anya-Nya) for strategic reasons and personal ambitions. This foreign involvement undoubtedly benefited the Anya-Nya National Armed Force politically, morally and military. Bibliogr., notes, ref.

Title: The politics of liberation in the southern Sudan 1967-1972: the role of Israel, African heads of State, and foreign mercenaries
Author: Poggo, Scopas
Year: 2001
Periodical: Uganda Journal (ISSN 0041-574X)
Volume: 47
Period: November
Pages: 34-48
Language: English
Notes: biblio. refs.
Geographic terms: Sudan
Northeast Africa
External link: https://www.ajol.info/index.php/uj/article/view/23051
Abstract: The civil war in the Sudan (1955-1972) is one of Africa’s longest and most devastating wars. The enlistment of foreign powers in the affairs of the Sudan shaped the magnitude and trend of this war. For example, the former Soviet Union provided financial and military assistance to the Sudan government. In this context, the people of southern Sudan began to seek financial, moral and military support from countries in sub-Saharan Africa, and other nations that were sympathetic to their liberation struggle. African leaders, including Milton Obote, Idi Amin (both Uganda), Jomo Kenyatta (Kenya), Mobutu Sese Seko (Zaire) and Haile Selassie (Emperor of Ethiopia), became involved in the Sudanese conflict for geopolitical and humanitarian reasons. On the other hand, Israel and soldiers of fortune rendered a helping hand to the southern Sudanese rebels (the Anya-Nya) for strategic reasons and personal ambitions. This foreign involvement undoubtedly benefited the Anya-Nya National Armed Force politically, morally and military. Bibliogr., notes, ref.