Legislative Aspects in Relation to HIV/AIDS Prevention in Zimbabwe

Twenty years into the epidemic, Zimbabwe is suffering from the severe effects of HIV/AIDS. In spite of nationwide campaigns to enhance knowledge on HIV/AIDS, its incidence does not seem to be declining. Several researchers have argued that issues related to cultural, economic, political and social factors are responsible for the continued spread of HIV/AIDS. The present author focuses on another critical area, that of legislation, which, if investigated, could significantly reverse the impact of the current HIV/AIDS epidemic. Since 1998, there has been a legal blueprint for the prevention of HIV/AIDS which, amongst others, criminalizes the wilful transmission of HIV. Two years after being drafted, this legal blueprint is still lying on some official’s desk. Another example is the Marriage Act of Zimbabwe which, amongst others, allows a male Zimbabwean to enter into marriage with up to ten women. The conclusion is that much more has to be done at the legal level, in terms of laws which affect sexual relationships between men and women, since these laws do not seem to take gender imbalances into account. As long as these biases remain, the incidence of HIV/AIDS will continue to escalate. Bibliogr., notes.

Title: Legislative Aspects in Relation to HIV/AIDS Prevention in Zimbabwe
Author: Shiripinda, Iris
Year: 2000
Periodical: SAFERE: Southern African Feminist Review (ISSN 1024-9451)
Volume: 4
Issue: 1
Pages: 37-44
Language: English
Notes: biblio. refs.
Geographic terms: Zimbabwe
Southern Africa
External link: https://www.ajol.info/index.php/safere/article/view/23988
Abstract: Twenty years into the epidemic, Zimbabwe is suffering from the severe effects of HIV/AIDS. In spite of nationwide campaigns to enhance knowledge on HIV/AIDS, its incidence does not seem to be declining. Several researchers have argued that issues related to cultural, economic, political and social factors are responsible for the continued spread of HIV/AIDS. The present author focuses on another critical area, that of legislation, which, if investigated, could significantly reverse the impact of the current HIV/AIDS epidemic. Since 1998, there has been a legal blueprint for the prevention of HIV/AIDS which, amongst others, criminalizes the wilful transmission of HIV. Two years after being drafted, this legal blueprint is still lying on some official’s desk. Another example is the Marriage Act of Zimbabwe which, amongst others, allows a male Zimbabwean to enter into marriage with up to ten women. The conclusion is that much more has to be done at the legal level, in terms of laws which affect sexual relationships between men and women, since these laws do not seem to take gender imbalances into account. As long as these biases remain, the incidence of HIV/AIDS will continue to escalate. Bibliogr., notes.