Some Issues Concerning Women in Senior Management: A Case Study from Ghana

This paper examines issues concerning women’s managerial careers in the central Civil Service in Accra, Ghana. 62 women from the Ministry of Finance and Economic Development; an environmental agency; the Parliamentary Office; the Office for the Civil Service; and the Ministry of Trade were interviewed as part of the Women in Public Life (WIPL) project, which was launched in Ghana in 1995. The following themes emerged from the data: employment as a civil servant is not seen to be particularly worthwile by many of the participants; women have to work harder than men to achieve the same promotions; women must not engage in or display a range of behaviours at the workplace which are considered to have a sexual element to them; and others, in particular supervisors, make inappropriate assumptions about the tensions between career and family. The paper comments on each of these four themes, and presents suggestions for policies and strategies which may begin to address them. Bibliogr., notes, ref., sum.

Title: Some Issues Concerning Women in Senior Management: A Case Study from Ghana
Author: Amos-Wilson, P.M.
Year: 1999
Periodical: Public Administration and Development
Volume: 19
Issue: 3
Period: August
Pages: 219-229
Language: English
Geographic term: Ghana
External link: https://doi.org/10.1002/(SICI)1099-162X(199908)19:33.0.CO;2-S
Abstract: This paper examines issues concerning women’s managerial careers in the central Civil Service in Accra, Ghana. 62 women from the Ministry of Finance and Economic Development; an environmental agency; the Parliamentary Office; the Office for the Civil Service; and the Ministry of Trade were interviewed as part of the Women in Public Life (WIPL) project, which was launched in Ghana in 1995. The following themes emerged from the data: employment as a civil servant is not seen to be particularly worthwile by many of the participants; women have to work harder than men to achieve the same promotions; women must not engage in or display a range of behaviours at the workplace which are considered to have a sexual element to them; and others, in particular supervisors, make inappropriate assumptions about the tensions between career and family. The paper comments on each of these four themes, and presents suggestions for policies and strategies which may begin to address them. Bibliogr., notes, ref., sum.